Tag Archives: university presses

#UPWeek 2017 Blog Tour: Libraries and Librarians Helping Us All #LookItUP

We’re now approaching the end of the sixth annual University Press Week 2017 and UP Week Blog Tour! Thank you and our university press colleagues for celebrating the value of our books and expertise of our authors with this year’s theme, #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters.

Each day this week university presses blogged about why facts, knowledge, and expertise matter. Today’s final day of posts explores how libraries, librarians, and university presses work together to promote scholarship.

Catch up on all of the posts from the UP Week Blog Tour and see you on social media with the #LookItUP and #ReadUP hashtags!

Friday: Libraries and Librarians Helping Us All #LookItUP

University of Missouri Press
The Lanford Wilson Collection at MU Libraries Special Collections and Rare Books

University of Nebraska Press
Introducing Lincoln’s Most Passionate Reader

University Press of Florida
Q&A with Digital Scholarship Librarian Laurie Taylor on New Open Books Series

University of Georgia Press
Librarians are our First Line of Defense against Fake News

University of Alabama Press
University Press Week: Knowledge Matters – Q&A with Associate Dean for Research and Technology Tom Wilson

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#UPWeek 2017 Blog Tour: #TwitterStorm

Welcome back to the sixth annual University Press Week 2017 and day four of the UP Week Blog Tour. We are thrilled to join fellow university presses to celebrate the value of our books and expertise of our authors with this year’s theme, #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters.

Each day this week university presses will be blogging about why facts, knowledge, and expertise matter. Today’s theme is #TwitterStorm, and features posts about how social media has contributed to the success of university press initiatives, titles, and scholarship.

Check back tomorrow for the final posts from the UP Week Blog Tour and join on social media with the #LookItUP and #ReadUP hashtags!

Thursday: #TwitterStorm

Harvard University Press
Social Media and Scholarship (and Impeachment)

Johns Hopkins University Press
Make Your Voice Heard in 2017’s Town Square: Tips to Effectively Participate in the Twitter Conversation

Athabasca University Press
University Press Week Blog Tour 2017: Making Publishing Visible

Beacon Press
Social Media’s Role in Lifting Up “For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood…and the Rest of Y’all Too” (University Press Week 2017)

#UPWeek 2017 Blog Tour: Producing the Books that Matter

Welcome back to the sixth annual University Press Week 2017 and day three of the UP Week Blog Tour. We are thrilled to join other university presses to celebrate the value of our books and expertise of our authors with this year’s theme, #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters.

Each day this week university presses will be blogging about why facts, knowledge, and expertise matter. Today’s theme is Producing the Books that Matter, and features pieces focusing on how editorial, production, and design help books succeed.

Check back throughout the week for more posts from the UP Week Blog Tour and join on social media with the #LookItUP and #ReadUP hashtags!

Wednesday: Producing the Books that Matter

University of Kansas Press
Producing Books that Matter; University Press Week, 2017

University of California Press
ASA, Interdisciplinary Associations, and American Studies Now

Georgetown University Press
UPWeek Blog Tour: Producing Books that Matter

UBC Press
Exciting times, indeed, but also nerve-wracking: UBC Press’ foray into trade publishing

University of Michigan Press
“Academic Ableism” Author Interview-Part 1

Fordham University Press
UP Week! Producing the Books that Matter

Yale University Press
Decoding the Voynich Manuscript

MIT Press
University Press Week: Inspired to be Resolutely Disobedient

#UPWeek 2017 Blog Tour: Scholarship Making a Difference and Selling the Facts

Happy sixth annual University Press Week 2017! We are thrilled to take part in this year’s UP Week Blog Tour and join other university presses to celebrate the value of our books and expertise of our authors with this year’s theme, #LookItUP: Knowledge Matters.

Each day this week university presses will be blogging about why facts, knowledge, and expertise matter. Monday featured posts about Scholarship Making a Difference. Today’s theme is Selling the Facts, and features posts from bookstores, booksellers, and other university press sales staff on selling books in today’s political climate or as a form of activism.

Check back throughout the week for more posts from the UP Week Blog Tour and join on social media with the #LookItUP and #ReadUP hashtags!

Monday: Scholarship Making a Difference

Wilfrid Laurier University Press
Why University Presses Matter by Daniel Heath Justice

Temple University Press
Celebrating University Press Week: Scholarship Making a Difference

Wayne State University Press
#UPWeek: Scholarship Makes a Difference

University Press of Colorado
Tools for Surviving in a Post-Truth World

Princeton University Press
University Press Week: Scholarship Makes a Difference

Oregon State University Press
Scholarship Making a Difference: The Alternate Route for Nuclear Disarmament

George Mason University Press
Playfair and the search for elusive truth

Cambridge University Press
The Struggle for Equality, Recognition and Reward

University of Toronto Press
Part 1: The Power of History to Galvanize and Energize
Part 2: Winning Hearts and Minds: Publishing that Matters

University of Washington Press
From the Desk of the Director: Knowledge and Facts Matter

Tuesday: Selling the Facts

University of Minnesota Press
#UPWeek: Knowing the Facts.

University of Texas Press
Selling the Facts in Independent Bookstores

University of Hawai`i Press
#LookItUP: Free Speech and the Media in UHP Journals

Johns Hopkins University Press
Ivy Bookshop: Selling the Facts and Serving the Community

Duke University Press
Selling the Facts: Sales Manager Jennifer Schaper Reports from the Frankfurt Book Fair

Columbia University Press
A Field Guide to Engaging with the World through Bookstores

University Press of Kentucky
At What Cost: Selling Books in the Age of Trump

University of Toronto Press
Selling the Books that Matter: Experiences of a Higher Ed Sales Rep

Announcing the 2017-2018 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellows

SEATTLE, WA — The University of Washington Press, the MIT Press, Duke University Press, the University of Georgia Press, and the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) today announce the recipients of the 2017-2018 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowships and future plans of the 2016-2017 Fellows.

The Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship was established in 2016 by the four university presses and the AAUP as the first cross-press initiative of its kind in the United States to address the marked lack of diversity in the academic publishing industry. The initiative seeks to create a pipeline program of academic publishing professionals with significant personal experience and engagement with diverse communities and a demonstrated ability to bring the understanding gleaned from such engagement to bear on their daily work.

The program provides professional and financial support to cohorts of four fellows per year for three years. The yearlong appointments offer each fellow immersive, on-the-job training along with one-on-one mentoring and opportunities for networking and professional development. Fellows are given the opportunity to connect with one another and meet industry colleagues at two AAUP annual meetings. Please join us in welcoming the 2017-2018 fellows and in congratulating the 2016-2017 fellows on their accomplishments, including securing full-time positions within scholarly publishing.

The 2017-2018 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellows:

Michael Baccam joins the University of Washington Press. He received an MFA in creative writing from Eastern Washington University’s Inland Northwest Center for Writers and a BA in English from the University of Iowa. His recent professional experience includes roles as an associate editor, copy editor, and production editor for leading science and medical publishers in Philadelphia. His scholarly interests encompass Asian American studies, Southeast Asian culture and history, and the art and literature of immigrant and refugee communities.

Kyle Gipson joins the MIT Press. He has worked as an editorial intern and an editorial assistant at Beacon Press, an independent publisher devoted to social justice. Kyle received a BA from Bard College, an MA in English from Harvard University, and a graduate secondary field in studies of women, gender, and sexuality from Harvard. He is ABD in Harvard’s Program in American Studies under the direction of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and his scholarly interests include African American history and literature, gender and sexuality studies, and performance studies.

Ana M. Jimenez-Moreno comes to the University of Georgia Press from the University of Notre Dame Press, where she was awarded the 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship from the College of Arts and Letters after completing her PhD in English at the University of Notre Dame. She received her BA from Rutgers University, where she was an English major and a history minor.  Ana was born in Bogotá, Colombia, and grew up in Edison, New Jersey. In her future career as an editor, Ana hopes to “incorporate voices that have been silenced, but also to include scholarship by those who work with problematic or ideologically compromised authors, groups, and schools of thought. To do so is to affirm and not simply value difference.“

Stephanie Gomez Menzies joins Duke University Press from the University of California–San Diego where she is currently completing her PhD in literature. Her scholarly work focuses on the global connections between performance, activism, and citizenship, particularly in the Caribbean. She has been an active member of the UCSD community, helping to create inclusive social and professional programming for graduate students and serving as a graduate representative to the LGBT, Cross-Cultural, and Women’s Centers. She has also worked on textbooks for secondary education and served as an expert on the Chinese Cultural Revolution for a textbook series.

The 2016-2017 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellow updates:

Maryam Arain (Duke University Press) started in April as assistant editor at NYU Press.

Niccole Leilanionapae’aina Coggins (University of Washington Press) will continue at the University of Washington Press as assistant editor, transitioning into her new position on June 1.

Jesús J. Hernández (The MIT Press) is cultivating opportunities in and out of publishing.

Christian Pizarro Winting (University of Georgia Press) started in March as editorial assistant at Columbia University Press.

The fellowship program is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation with a four-year, $682,000 grant.

Media Contact: Casey LaVela / Publicity and Communications Manager / University of Washington Press / 206.221.4994

Announcing the 2016–2017 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellows

SEATTLE, WA—The University of Washington Press, the MIT Press, Duke University Press, the University of Georgia Press, and the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) today announce the recipients of the 2016–2017 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowships. The program is the first cross-press initiative of its kind in the United States to address the marked lack of diversity in the academic publishing industry.

The Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship was established in 2016 by the four university presses and the AAUP as a pipeline program to diversify academic publishing by offering apprenticeships in acquisitions departments. The program will create cohorts of four fellows per year for three years.

Fellowships are awarded to outstanding candidates who have significant personal experience and engagement with diverse communities and a demonstrated ability to bring the understandings gleaned from such engagement to the daily work of academic publishing.

The yearlong appointments offer each fellow opportunities for one-on-one mentoring as well as monthly cross-press video conferences led by staff at the partner presses covering a range of topics to supplement the hands-on training. Fellows are given the opportunity to connect with one another and engage with industry colleagues at two AAUP annual meetings.

The fellowship program aims to develop best practices for fostering diversity at all levels of the profession. Further, this collaboration will focus attention on the centrality of diversity to the future of global academic discourse and, it is hoped, will inspire related efforts to prioritize diversity more broadly in the publishing industry.

Although university presses have long fostered and supported diversity-related fields such as Native and Indigenous studies; African American studies; women’s, gender, and sexuality studies; and Asian American studies, the fellowship program represents a significant investment in creating career development opportunities and a supportive environment for diversity in publishing.

The 2016–2017 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellows:

Maryam Arain comes to Duke University Press from Chicago, where she has been working as a freelance editor and volunteering at the Crescent Learning Center, a day care that serves refugee populations from Somalia and Burma. She previously worked as a junior commissioning editor at Oxford University Press in Karachi, Pakistan, and as a communications coordinator at the Council on American Islamic Relations in Chicago. Maryam received her BA from Dartmouth and her MA in postcolonial studies from SOAS, University of London.

Niccole Leilanionapae‘āina Coggins comes to the University of Washington Press from the department of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she is currently a PhD candidate working under the direction of Paul Spickard. Her research interests focus on Hawaiian history as well as on identity and mixed-race youth. Niccole’s work with underrepresented communities includes participation in a local hula hālau (school) and various student life programs. Niccole received her BA from Carleton College and her MA in religion and society from the Graduate Theological Union.

Jesús J. Hernández joins the MIT Press. He held two visiting assistant professorships at Williams College and Mount Holyoke College, where his scholarly interests were in the areas of American/ethnic studies, Latina/o studies, literary studies, diaspora studies, and queer theory. He received his BA in ethnic studies from Brown University and his PhD in American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California.

Christian Pizarro Winting comes to the University of Georgia Press from Chicago, where he has been freelance copyediting and working as a research associate for a corporate recruiting company. Christian has also worked as a graduate intern on the Hemingway Letters Project at Pennsylvania State University and tutored underperforming high school students in the Chicago public school system. Christian has a BA in liberal arts from St. John’s College, Santa Fe, New Mexico, and an MA in humanities (American literature emphasis) from the University of Chicago.

The fellowship program is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation with a four-year, $682,000 grant.

Media Contact: Casey LaVela / Publicity and Communications Manager / University of Washington Press / 206.221.4994

Meet the 2016-2017 Mellon University Press Diversity Fellow: Niccole Leilanionapae‘āina Coggins

Niccole Coggins staff news photoOn June 1, 2016, University of Washington Press welcomed our first Mellon University Press Diversity Fellow, Niccole Leilanionapae‘āina Coggins, who joins us from the Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Niccole’s research interests focus on Hawaiian history as well as identity and mixed race youth. Niccole is currently a PhD candidate working, under the direction of Dr. Paul Spickard. on her dissertation titled “‘I Wish They Would Leave Those Negro Soldiers Alone’:  Native Hawaiian and Japanese American Perceptions and Interactions with Blacks in World War II Hawai’i,” which focuses on how the military changed the identity of Hawaiian society during the territorial period.

Niccole’s work with underrepresented communities includes participation in a local hula hālau, and student life programs at Carleton College, Macalester College, and UCSB. She characterizes her scholarly research as profoundly personal, given her mixed race identity as both Black and Native Hawaiian.

With a BA in American studies, an MA in religion and society, and as a PhD candidate in history, with special emphasis on Pacific Islander studies and Native American studies, Niccole’s academic interests intersect with a number of areas of our lists here at the University of Washington Press.

Please welcome Niccole to the Press!

Read more about the Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship Program from UW Press editor in chief and principal investigator Larin McLaughlin // Read the Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship Program press release