National Women’s Studies Association Conference Preview

UW Press is excited to attend the upcoming 2015 National Women’s Studies Association annual conference in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from November 12-15, 2015 and to celebrate the publication of the first book in the Decolonizing Feminisms series, Humanizing the Sacred: Sisters in Islam and the Struggle for Gender Justice in Malaysia, with a book signing with author Azza Basarudin.

Edited by Piya Chatterjee, Decolonizing Feminisms: Antiracist and Transnational Praxis seeks exemplary progressive and radical feminist writing and scholarship that privileges the integral connections between theory, activism, policy making, and other forms of social action. The series is particularly interested in interdisciplinary writing that that considers the ways in which historical and contemporary forms of colonization, occupation, and imperialism compel critical and imaginative frameworks for political resistance and progressive social change. Learn more in the series flyer.

UW Press Editor in Chief Larin McLaughlin will be representing the Press at booth #210. If you are attending the meeting, please come by to learn more about our new and forthcoming titles in women’s and gender studies and beyond. Use the #ReadUP and #nwsa2015 hashtags to follow along with the conference on social media.

Check out more information about the scheduled book signing and select featured titles below.

BOOK SIGNING WITH AZZA BASARUDIN

Friday, November 13 at 2:45 p.m., Booth #210

Humanizing the Sacred: Sisters in Islam and the Struggle for Gender Justice in Malaysia
By Azza Basarudin

This first book in the Decolonizing Feminisms series examines how Sunni women activists in Malaysia are fracturing institutionalized Islamic authority by generating new understandings of rights and redefining the moral obligations of their community. Based on ethnographic research of Sisters of Islam (SIS), a nongovernmental organization of professional women promoting justice and equality, Basarudin examines how women “live” Islam through the integration of piety and reason and the implications of women’s political activism for the transformation of Islamic tradition itself.

Black Women in Sequence: Re-inking Comics, Graphic Novels, and Anime
By Deborah Elizabeth Whaley

This study of Black women’s participation in comic art takes readers on a search for women of African descent in comics subculture from the 1971 appearance of the Skywald Publications character “the Butterfly”—the first Black female superheroine in a comic book—to contemporary comic books, graphic novels, film, manga, and video gaming. Whaley includes interviews with artists and writers and suggests that the treatment of the Black female subject in sequential art says much about the place of people of African descent in national ideology in the United States and abroad.

Living Together, Living Apart: Mixed Status Families and US Immigration Policy
Edited by April Schueths and Jodie Lawston
Foreword by Mary Romero 

This collection of personal narratives and academic essays focuses on the daily lives and experiences, as well as the broader social contexts, for mixed status families—families that include both citizens and noncitizens—in the United States. Immigration reform remains one of the most contentious issues in the United States today and for these families it is more than a political issue: it’s a deeply personal one. Undocumented family members and legal residents lack the rights and benefits of their family members who are US citizens, while family members and legal residents sometimes have their rights compromised by punitive immigration policies based on a strict “citizen/noncitizen” dichotomy.

Read a Q&A with coeditor April Schueths

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