Tag Archives: Asians in Colorado

September 2016 News, Reviews, and Events


Congratulations to Sylvanna M. Falcón, winner of the National Women’s Studies Association 2016 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize for Power Interrupted, selected “for its clear writing, as well as its adept integration of intersectional and transnational analyses to assess the grassroots feminist work that employs international frameworks when addressing gender and racial issues through the global stage that the UN provides.”

Reviews and Interviews

David Takami reviews Judy Bentley’s Walking Washington’s History in the Seattle Times: “Coming soon to a city near you: clusters of visitors gazing intently at a handheld object as a way to engage with their surroundings. . . . The commendable new book by Judy Bentley. . . . is an immensely appealing approach to writing history. . . . Bentley demonstrates that history is not abstruse and remote from our current experience; it is ever present—and just around the next corner.“

Christian Martin reviews the book on the Chattermarks blog from North Cascades Institute: “Bentley provides brief but engaging historical overviews. . . . There are stories in the ground beneath our feet, dashed dreams lingering in the air, as well as legacies of benevolent forethought from a not-so-distant past all around us.”

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April 2016 News, Reviews, and Events


Author David Williams with his mom and fellow author, Jacqueline B. Williams (Photo via AKCHO)

Author David B. Williams with his mom and fellow author, Jacqueline B. Williams (Photo via AKCHO)

Congratulations to David B. Williams, winner of the 2016 Association of King County Historical Organizations (AKCHO) Virginia Marie Folkins Award for Too High and Too Steep. The awards event will be held on Tuesday, June 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m., at the Northwest African American Museum. Read more at the AKCHO site.

Reviews and Interviews

The PBS series 10 Parks That Changed America, featuring Gas Works Park and interviews with Richard Haag and The Landscape Architecture of Richard Haag author Thaisa Way, will air on Tuesday, April 12. Watch the preview and select clips now.
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Organization of American Historians Conference Preview

The Organization of American Historians heads to Providence, Rhode Island from April 7-10 and we will be debuting and previewing a number of new history titles across sub-fields including American and transnational history, African American studies, Asian American studies, Native American and Indigenous studies, and more.

Stop by booth #524 if you are attending the meeting to see our full range of titles and to meet Editor in Chief Larin McLaughlin and Senior Acquisitions Editor Ranjit Arab. Use the #OAH2016 hashtag to follow along with the conference on social media.

We feature a few of our new and forthcoming titles, including several books publishing soon in our Indigenous Confluences series, here:

New releases:

Forthcoming from our Indigenous Confluences series:

California through Native Eyes: Reclaiming History
By William J. Bauer, Jr.
Forthcoming June 2016

Using oral histories of Concow, Pomo, and Paiute workers, taken as part of a New Deal federal works project, this innovative book reveals how Native peoples have experienced and interpreted the history of the land we now call California. The result both challenges the “California story” and enriches it with new voices and important points of view, serving as a model for understanding Native historical perspectives in other regions.

Native Students at Work: American Indian Labor and Sherman Institute’s Outing Program, 1900-1945
By Kevin Whalen
Foreword by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert
Forthcoming June 2016

For the first time, historian Kevin Whalen reveals the challenges of Native people from around the American Southwest who participated in labor “outing programs” at Sherman Institute, a federal Indian boarding school in Riverside, California. Despite cruel working conditions, young Native men and women used the outing program to their advantage whenever they could, forming urban indigenous communities and sharing money and knowledge gained in the city with those back home.

Other featured titles:

American Historical Association Conference Preview

We are thrilled to kick off our 2016 conference season with the 130th annual meeting of the American Historical Association in downtown Atlanta, Georgia from January 7-10, 2016. This year’s theme is “Global Migrations: Empires, Nations, and Neighbors,” and we have a great new lineup of history books to show off.

UW Press senior acquisitions editor Ranjit Arab will be representing the Press at booth #1709. If you are attending the meeting, please come by to learn more about our new and forthcoming titles across global, national, and regional histories. Use the #ReadUP and #AHA16 hashtags to follow along with the conference on social media.

Learn more about a few featured and forthcoming titles below.

Emperor Hirohito and the Pacific War
By Noriko Kawamura

Drawing on previously unavailable primary sources, historian Kawamura reexamines the controversial role Emperor Hirohito played during the Pacific War and re-situates Hirohito as a conflicted man who struggled to deal with his role as monarch.

The Portland Black Panthers: Empowering Albina and Remaking a City
By Lucas N. N. Burke and Judson L. Jeffries
Forthcoming April 2016

This history of the unique Portland branch of the Black Panther Party adds complexity to our understanding of the civil rights movement throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Forgery and Impersonation in Imperial China: Popular Deceptions and the High Qing State
By Mark McNicholas
Forthcoming April 2016

Across eighteenth-century China a wide range of common people forged government documents or pretended to be officials or other agents of the state. This examination of case records and law codes traces the legal meanings and social and political contexts of small-time swindles that were punished as grave political transgressions.

Asians in Colorado: A History of Persecution and Perseverance in the Centennial State
By William Wei
Forthcoming April 2016

Wei reconstructs what life was like for the early Chinese and Japanese pioneers and reveals how the treatment of Asian Americans resonates with the experiences of other marginalized groups in American society.